WIN A PAIR OF RENEGADE HOOF BOOTS

This week GoBarefoot – The Hoof Trim Network™ is running a competition to win a pair of our most popular boots – the RENEGADE.

All you have to do is LIKE The Hoof Trim Network FaceBook Page and you will go into the draw to win.

If you want your name to go into the draw a second time, then tell us how a pair of Renegades would make a
difference to you and your horse, AND tag a friend in that comment. Easy Peasy.

The competition will close at Midnight Friday 12th Sept 2014 Australian EST. And the winner will be announced by
midnight Sunday 14th Sept 2014 AEST.

GoBarefoot – The Hoof Trim Network™ fits and supplies a range of hoof boots including EasyCare Gloves, Trails,
Back Country, Epics, Transitions, RX Therapy, and EasyShoes, as well as Equine Fusion and Renegades.

CELEBRATED AUSTRALIAN ACTOR COLIN FRIELS TO COMPERE THE FUNCTIONAL HOOF CONFERENC

He’s won a swag of acting awards. Australians probably remember him best as Detective Senior Inspector Frank
Holloway in the long running televisions series Water Rats. Or maybe as the shy mechanical genius
with a tram obsession in the feature film Malcolm. Or more recently as Willy Loman in the stage play
Death of a Salesman at Sydney’s Belvoir St Theatre.

Now Colin Friels is coming to Daylesford, Victoria, Australia as Master of Ceremonies for The Functional Hoof
Conference! (Nov 6th to 9th, 2014)

One of the lesser known facts about this celebrated but private Austalian actor is that his passion in life is
horses! He’s run his own small herd on a piece of land south of Sydney for many years now. “I’ve loved horses all
my life. I’m self taught. I’ve never competed.” Although he did win a celebrity cutting comp at Tamworth last
year.

“I’m a student of the classical (C18th horseman) François Robichon de La Guérinière,” he says. He talks animatedly
about the shoulder-in and other gymnastic exercises he does with the individuals in his band – often riding out in
the bush for a day or so, with several in tow. He mostly trims – and conditions – his own horse’s hooves. But he
also has an old timer farrier he can call on.


FRANÇOIS ROBICHON DE LA
GUÉRINIÈRE

Friel’s equid empathy embraces both the psyche and the physical. “I live for horses. I never stop thinking about
them. I just love the animal,” he says.

At the centre of his approach is the study of biomechanics “Learning the scientific biomechanics of the horse is
crucial……I am steeped in what is classical and that is an absolute respect for the horse. I want them to go
straight, true and upright. All I want is for the horse to feel proud. I want to communicate with the horse so the
horse thought he thought of it. (first). And I want to do that using classical principles.”

As organisers of the conference we are delighted to have Colin Friels onboard to guide proceedings.

For more info go to the conference website or check out our Facebook Page.

Bookings are via the website at http://www.thefunctionalhoofconference.com.

CASE STUDY: RUSTY

Rusty’s foot capsule was way too high and his toe too long (see images below).

After just 3 months of regular trims, the picture is entirely different.

Dorsal foot before the trim

Dorsal foot after 3 months

Lateral foot before the trim

Lateral foot 3 months later

A TRIM’S A TRIM’S A TRIM….ISN’T IT?

Ever wondered what the difference is between a farrier trim and a barefoot trim? IS there really a difference?
SHOULD there be a difference?

Well there certainly IS a difference …….. not only between a farrier and a barefoot trim, but between farrier
trims from one farrier to the next. And also between barefoot trims, from one barefoot trimmer to the next.

So the next question is … what does a good trim look like? And why do these people trim the way they do? What
about the horse?

Well, thanks to the American Farriers Journal, we here in Australia will have the chance to compare actual trims
done by six well-regarded practitioners. Two of them are farriers who have represented Australia internationally –
Craig Jones from Queensland and Michael Saunders from Tasmania.


Craig Jones

Michael Saunders

Luke Wells-Smith is a farrier turned vet, who now specializes in hoofcare working for the Scone Equine Podiatry
and Lameness Centre.


Luke Wells-Smith

James Welz

The trimmers are James Welz from Arizona, USA, who together with his wife Yvonne, runs The Horse’s Hoof Magazine.


Thorsten Kaiser

Thorsten Kaiser who is a Strasser Hoofcare instructor from New Zealand; and Rebecca Scott who runs a team of
Victorian-based trimmers.


Rebecca Scott

This is an opportunity to inspect their freeze dried cadaver trims, listen to the practitioners describe why they
trimmed the way they did, listen to the panel discussion and ask questions about the respective approaches.

“A Table with All the Trimmings” will be the centrepiece panel discussion at The Functional Hoof Conference,
in Daylesford, Victoria, Australia in November. It will be co-moderated by vets Dr Andrew Van Eps from Queensland
University Vet Faculty, and Dr Neal Valk who is in private practice in Tennessee, USA.

This is an opportunity for vets, farriers, trimmers and body workers to see for themselves and evaluate the
different approaches. If you are involved in equine hoof care, can you afford to miss this highly anticipated
event?

___________________________________________

  • Thanks to the American Farriers Journal which has kindly allowed The Functional Hoof Conference to use the
    name they created for a similar event at the American Farriers Conference. Thanks also to Allie Hayes of
    HorseScience for permission to use her concept.

For more info on the conference and to book go to:

www.thefunctionalhoofconference.com

TIPS FOR FEEDING HORSES DURING WINTER

As you sit all cosy in front of your fireplace, you cant help but notice your horse huddled up under his tree or shelter with a miserable ‘I’m cold!’ look on his face. Apart from throwing on an extra rug, what can you do to help him feel better? Here are a few tips to make the winter blues easier for your horse.

A HEALTHY HORSE HAS HEALTHY HOOVES!

So, what can we feed our horses that’s good for their hooves?
This question should more accurately be, what can we feed our horses that’s good for THEM?

What’s good for the hoof is good for the whole horse. Feeding the hoof is no more or less complicated than simply feeding the horse well and providing all they need for optimal tissue growth and repair. If your horse is getting a quality balanced diet with adequate amounts of trace and major minerals, the right kind of fats and oils, good sources of antioxidants, vitamins and quality proteins with adequate amino acid profiles – then you will have a healthy horse and a healthy horse has healthy hooves.

IS THE VETERINARY PROGNOSIS FOR THE BAREFOOT HOOFCARE APPROACH CHANGING?

Recently I was called to a pony. The new owner wanted me to look at her feet and trim her. The pony – unbeknownst to the new owner – was laminitic and foundering. The former owner had reportedly said that the horse had gone laminitic some months ago, but was now well on the road to recovery. So the new owner thought things were hunky dory.

When I saw the pony I suggested that it might have rotated its pedal bones. “No,” the new owner told me. “I’ve got the X-Rays and they don’t show any rotation.” Great, I thought. “Can I have a look?” So the radiographs were produced and sure enough… rotation in all four feet. It didn’t take radiographs to show that. It was obvious just looking at the feet. But like so many owners, this lady didn’t know what she was looking at.

WHY DO I NEED TO HAVE MY HORSE TRIMMED AT FOUR WEEKLY INTERVALS?

We are often asked by new clients or potential clients why we recommend that they have their horse’s hooves trimmed every four weeks. Traditionally farriers have recommended every six to eight weeks.

And many horses, if you look casually at their feet at the four week mark – well, they look kinda OK. But its worth picking the hooves up and noting the changes. By week four if you look closely, most horses will have 4 to 6mm of hoof wall protruding below their sole.

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